Medical Marijuana 411 values providing our readers with information about the latest cannabis related topics for educational purposes and not for the intention of advocacy. This is not an advocacy-based organization. For ailment specific questions, please consult your primary care physician.
21 Dec

Groundbreaking Medical Marijuana Study At America’s First Hospice

BRANFORD, Conn. (WTNH) – Easing pain and improving quality of life for end of life patients — the focus of a groundbreaking medical marijuana study. Groundbreaking medical marijuana study at America’s first hospice- The first of its kind in New England. The research will soon be underway at  The Connecticut Hospice in Branford. This is a federally

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16 May

Marijuana Can Help Ease Fibromyalgia Symptoms

Researchers are now pushing the benefits of medical marijuana as the leading treatment for fibromyalgia relief. Fibromyalgia is the chronic pain and sleep disturbances can now be helped by using medical marijuana. Patients have been struggling to find a cure or at least a pain relief. Most pharmaceutical prescriptions have bad side effects or negative

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28 Jul

Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis A condition characterized by weakness and brittleness of the bones. Osteoporosis means “porous bone.” If you look at healthy bone under a microscope, you will see that parts of it look like a honeycomb. If you have osteoporosis, the holes and spaces in the honeycomb are much bigger than they are in healthy bone.

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05 Sep

Medical Marijuana For Pain

Are patients in medical cannabis states substituting pot for potentially lethal painkillers? It appears that way. According to data published in the Journal of the American Medical Association Internal Medicine, the enactment of statewide medicinal marijuana laws is associated with significantly lower state-level opioid overdose mortality rates. Investigators conducted a time-series analysis of medical cannabis laws and state-level

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07 May

Osteoporosis and Research

There are many aspects that one can talk about. One is the basic biochemical, pharmacological, scientific aspect of the whole problem. Here we have a new neurotransmitter. A group of compounds that have a huge amount of tasks if we look at the chemically related compound, I made a list of that, these compounds are involved almost all physiological reactions. So many of them, That I think here there is so much work to be done by scientists over the next 20, 30, 40 years. A lot of those compounds are around, some of them bind to the cannabinoid receptors, others are just chemically related and bind to other receptors are involved in many many other things. And I mentioned before, those that bind to the Cb2 receptors are part of a general protective facility, if you wish, in our body like the immune system. So that is the basic thing, then there is the medical thing, we have to find out how we can use them and what are the diseases we can use these compounds against.

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07 May

Osteoporosis

These two receptors that are specific to cannabinoids. But cannabinoids also, some of them bind to other receptors. There is one-called 133 I think, GPR133, there is another one, which is GPR18. I may be mistaken on the numbers, but I think GPR18, GPR133 and so on. They are not specific for the cannabinoids so there is a lot of discussion between the pharmacologists should we call them cannabinoid receptors. The decision at the moment is lets wait and sees. At the moment we have only two that have been approved as cannabinoid receptors. All the others with a question mark. Two receptors have evolved for certain specific conditions, feeding for example, appetite, feeding, and things of that sort. But some of the other actions most definitely go through other systems.

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07 May

Dr. Raphael Mechoulam

Endocannabinoids this is the short name for endogenous cannabinoids. Cannabinoids is a compound, which acts on two receptors. One receptor is found mainly in the brain, the other receptor is found mainly in the periphery. But, surprisingly, or maybe not so surprisingly, during certain diseases the second receptor that is not present in the brain starts to pop up. All of a sudden it is available there. So the suggestion has been made by many others, and us that actually this receptor, the Cb2 receptor, is part of a protective mechanism. We have protective systems in our body. The immune system is a protective system. It guards us against microbes and viruses things like that. If we didnt have an immune system, we would be dead in a week. Probably eaten up by microbes.

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