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Medical Marijuana and Music – Spring Gathering Festival Plants New Seeds for Patients

Daily Dose 2011-06-12 0 comments

A medical marijuana expo and music festival brings out the best in both worlds as the brightest minds and musical talents shine light on a very important subject

By Sam Sabzehzar |  June 12, 2011

Master grower Kyle Kushman and Cypress Hill's B-Real meet Joey and Mieko as the rapper is star-stuck with the two. (Photo credit: MedicalMarijuana411.com)

When most people think about the 60’s, no matter where you lived or if you were born, some of the motived motifs are music and marijuana.

This past weekend, as thousands gathered in Southern California for a music festival and medical marijuana expo, many messages were heard loud and clear.

With Damian and Stephen Marley saying goodnight to the sun, artists like Snoop Dogg and Cypress Hill ended the evening in celebratory fashion, while at the same time taking the time to ask everyone to do what the panelists were encouraging them to do throughout the day: something.

The Dogg Pound was also there, sharing and caring backstage with Joey, 12, who was diagnosed with autism over a decade ago, leaving a trail of pills ten years in the wake of a disastrous medical regimen before his mother turned to medical cannabis.

Joey’s mother, Mieko Hester Perez, has helped save her son’s life after introducing him to medical marijuana, is helping other families through a foundation she formed for her son, aptly called The Unconventional Foundation For Autism.

Mikki Norris explains how the nicest, most honest people are medical cannabis patients and they deserve to feel supported.

One of the most common themes throughout the day was the need for the movement to focus on the patient.

“With all the targeting efforts by law enforcement, it’s imperative that we stand up as patients and demand our rights,” says Lanny Swardlow, who is pleased to see a peaceful gathering of medical marijuana patients and advocates have a party in a county that has virtually banned access to the plant.

Even the San Bernardino Police Department noticed how peaceful a concert and expo can be when cannabis is introduced as an option in peoples lives, as one officer noted that he noticed how short the beer lines were.

Stephanie Landa, who founded the group LPOP after spending time in prison from growing plants for patients, asked Kyle Kushman what kind of steps growers can take to ensure the best quality of medicine can be grown for patients with special needs, like age, or a desire to not feel intoxication.

“Using nutrients that don’t have any animal products, or like making sure your plants are vegan, ensures they don’t get the heavy metals that might be in some of the animal-based nutrient products available,” explains Kushman, who founded Kushman Veganics and specializes in special needs patients.

Martin Lee, far right, explains the importance of CBD and encourages others to learn more at ProjectCBD.org.

Other advocates, like Project CBD’s Martin Lee, understands the value of allowing the science to speak for itself and encourages a dialogue for helping others understand the science regarding cannabidiol (CBD), which has a high efficacy rate, but very little high, if any.

The author of Acid Dreams and contributor to Project Uncensored sees many parallels to that era and believes that when the general public understands knows there is a body of scientific evidence available, while they may not read it or understand how it works, believe that cannabis ought to be an option for those that may benefit.

“The science angle is what really surprised me the most,” Lee remembers. You can find many of the cannabidiol-based scientific discoveries at ProjectCBD.org, and he is now¬†finishing up a social context for cannabis in a new book to be released early 2012.

Science is also showing how large of a category “those that may benefit” really is, as more and more people are coming out and saying that they consume cannabis, and how much better their life is because of it.

People like Joey, 12, who needs to eat a brownie to get the form of medicine that has saved his life and can now literally come out to events like this and help inspire others to do their part so that Mieko can help moms in places like Mississippi who still don’t have access to this, and because of that, perhaps still don’t understand the science.